Of Changing POV -Jami Gold

Head-hopping is something I do constantly–granted when I do it, it’s done though a scene change–however, I forget to mark it in some way.

For those who do head-hopping and want some advice on changing POV here’s helpful bit:

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Today’s a holiday in the U.S., so I’m dusting off and updating a post from the archives. While you’re here, don’t forget to comment on my Blogiversary post for a chance to win “me.” Want me to beta read for you or pick my brain about a writing or story problem? Now’s your chance! *grin*

The old version of this post recently came up in one of my writing loops because many beginning writers want to share everything they know about their characters and their story. We see this issue in information dumps of backstory or story research. And we also see this issue in the desire to share everything that every character is thinking and feeling.

However, once we gain experience, we realize it’s good for readers to have questions and to figure things out from the subtext. The Emotion Thesaurus by Angela Ackerman and Becca Puglisi is excellent at giving suggestion on how to show emotion, both from the point-of-view (POV) character as well as from a non-POV character. Simply wanting the reader to know the emotions of another character is not a reason to switch POV. *smile*

Once we’ve determined a POV change is really needed—think emotional arcs, plot turning points, or who has the most at risk—we need to know how to do changes in close third person POV properly. I hope you enjoy!

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Can’t Decide on a Solid Time

My manuscript is ‘completed’, and is in the editing phase. Thanks to a beta reader, she made me realize that my scene setting is sparse.

My original intention for this universe of mine was supposed to be sort of ‘timelessness’. Cellphones and the like used minimally. Since, the book focuses on the supernatural/fantastical, I didn’t see it too important if I focused on technology much. But, as I developed the story, I realized the setting itself indeed was a bit gaseous.

I fleshed out the original concept I had the 1910-1930’s ‘timeless’ feel coupled with the technology of about the 1980’s. Since I wanted a certain level of technological refinement, I set in 2035. That would help improve the airship technology, which is the only sort of aerial mode of transportation.

However, I felt since there was such minimal use of technology already–then would it proper for me to merely set it in 1910’s? Is me setting this in the future without it playing into the tone of the book a bit unnecessary? Such as Fallout is set to appear like the 50’s and what not because it was the height of nuclear tech age. LOTR, taking place in a perpetual dark ages. (Or whatever the proper term would be), and deals with knights, dragons, wizards and so forth. These settings play into the main concepts presented in the stories.giphy

I can sort of see that the 1910’s older tech would cause disruption in long communication. The grainy footage and what have you would help emphasize the mystery of the supernatural. There is a certain level of ‘horror’ or ‘mysteriousness’ granted by limited tech, and older time periods when dealing with monsters. (At least to me) There are disadvantages to my already established story should I set it in 1910, such as scenes with cellphones would need to be written out, regular phones could be used sure–but scenes when information is immediately conveyed won’t really be possible. Of course I did consider a sort of portable-telegraph, a round about cellphone that runs off of picking up on certain radio frequencies. But I doubt it.

However, as I’ve gone through this I’m still uncertain if I should set the year in the 1910’s or 2030’s. What are your thoughts if any? Am I overthinking this? I really can’t seem to settle on one or the other and it’s been driving me mad.

Can’t Decide on a Solid Time