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To imagine, or dream, of the world: friends, families, pets, shops and weather; technology and governments, and all of their mundane and fantastic activity. Then to imagine, you cease to be, no longer you, your ego, your memories and desires disintegrate. Never to influence anything again beyond memories some may carry.

    Your dearest companions live their lives–as you watch; an apathetic echo, that deforms into the trough of dreamless slumber. And in that neither light, nor dark no-space; the universe subsists, and you will never know.  In this void–it is the same place you were before you were born.

    If you are reborn, you will not be who you were. Nothing you’ve done, you’ll ever know you’ve done, and knowing it would achieve nothing; for you, your entire identity died. Who is reborn is not you as you are now, just as who you are now is not who you were before this samsaric crest.
   

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Empty Mind

The trees have names; memories contained in the forest      
The world outside our mind, rarely seen 
Outside our roles and careers, culture and philosophy
Past idiocrasy through which we digest all things 
Beyond good and evil; language cast aside
Dispatched with our ego and vocabulary
No longer encoding; a mental stasis; an empty mind
 

Empty Mind

Weather

An important facet, I believe gets too little attention is weather in fiction. (Some games too, but it’s becoming a bit more important) When I say weather though I do not necessarily mean extravagantly destructive storms that rip a city apart. I mean almost the opposite. Writing how, “she pulled her hand from the cold railing and wiped the morning rain water on her pants”, or “his hat had become white again” (from snowfall), or “her bottle of water had warmed. She sat, sweat dripping from her bangs. A distant thunderous storm mocked her.”

light rain

These aren’t the best examples, but they are instances of weather that affects characters insomuch as to let the reader feel the world but not cripple the character, nor derail the plot-line just to put some example of weather. It should blend into what’s happening, and I believe is important. The days with overcast and are slightly chilly are just as important as a never-ending drougt, or a hurricane wiping electricity from a city.

 

Weather

Rebirth

Death and dieing should be important events, but not everyone needs to stay dead. The problem then arrives for a writer, death should have weight (unless that’s not the kind of story you’re telling), in which case their rebirth should change something, unless of course it was a quick fake-out-death/trick and not much time has passed or something. In such a case it’s best to use your interpretation.

However, assuming they died and are as dead as dead can be but are resurrected or the equivalent; either the character or the environment needs to have altered. Otherwise their death was indeed meaningless. Perhaps the character is the same, but people treat them differently—they did just come back from the dead after all. Or their persona has been transformed—or their body isn’t quite functional in some aspects. Maybe they return inhuman. There’s numerous ways to show the significance of their death and rebirth.

These are just musings and aren’t any sort of requirement. (Which in Of itself is a bold remark about the value of my thoughts) In any case hopfully this is good food to help get ones mind churning.

Rebirth

The Bad Ending

So, this builds off of my previous post, but I felt I ought to expand and refine the content. While there is an overabundance (for my taste) of Happy Endings in the west, I find that although I enjoy bitter sweet endings personally, Happy Endings are attractive. Thus, peppering into a work with a happy ending, miserable, or bad endings, is prudent. Including scenes of other people who didn’t make it in time, who were tortured, killed, starved and so forth will enliven the environment—make it immediate. Potential peril that may befall the protagonist doesn’t always have to concern them directly. snowstorm.gif

Perhaps they stumble upon a mine that is said to contain treasure, but as they explore they encounter bodies of those who were killed by traps, or cave-ins, and the like, and them reacting sincerely. Panic, needing to calm down. Growing cautious. Not only would it help the protagonist avoid what their predecessor did but it would also show what would happen if they missed a step, and express their character.

Likewise, showing someone who maybe was stuck in a vault during an invasion who suffocates, since can’t get out given everyone is either dead or evacuated. The readers discovers this through evidence before the protagonist finds the body.scarything.gif

This highlights and expands the universe you’ve created, shows misery and makes the reader potentially care about these otherwise narratively speaking, insignificant characters. Attack on Titan does this well. The viewer watches a battle taking place, and witnesses the deaths of these characters as the battle intensifies. You hear the last things they cry before dieing–you see what the fear before death, and thankfully, some escape, and grow from the experience that otherwise would be ineffectual without these characters’ unfortunate endings. Without failure there can be no weight to success, and the world around the protagonist is just as significant as the protagonist themselves.

 

The Bad Ending

Misfortune and Unfortunate Endings 

So, this here is a bit different from what I post. But, I find the stories of the Fallout series to be of excellent fun and drama. The universe is interesting and has inspired some of the facets of my own writing and world-building. So, I figured since I’ve taken the time to take these photos to share them! Perhaps they will be inspiring to writers who might see them.

I promise(ish), this sort of entry will be sparse–but Fallout 76 has been inspiring to some capacity for my own stories. To write side stories where things don’t go well, where people commit suicide, fail, are betrayed, eaten and other misfortunes. Adding side-stories characters come across–or hear from other secondary and significant characters are important. They highlight the potential end any of the protagonists could meet. That any of their lovers of friends could also meet horrific and miserable ends.

Misfortune and Unfortunate Endings 

‘In-World’ Books and Other Documents

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I’ve devised, and hope to be able to apply, excerpts from documents advertisements and notes in my book’s appendix. These passages would be from documents and the like within the book, but having the excerpts in the main manuscript chances that it bog the pacing of the story down too much. This is a method for me to do further additional world-building that interested fans or curious readers could indulge.

It would also give me another chance to flex my creative muscles. Whether or not I can do this, I think I’ll probably end up drafting up these documents just for writing practice and world building I can use to enliven my book’s universe for myself.

‘In-World’ Books and Other Documents